Choppy Market

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Choppy Market

A situation in which prices in a market or index fluctuate, sometimes wildly, but end at a rough equilibrium. A choppy market may be a short-term trend. For example, NASDAQ may begin a week or month at 1,500 and fluctuate as low as 1,100 or as high as 1,900, but end the period at roughly 1,500.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stricter regulation and choppy markets had affected profits, the bank said.
Thursday did nothing to ease choppy markets as the Swiss National Bank announced it was abandoning its minimum exchange rate for the franc.
But recent data show some hedge-fund equity strategies are attracting money, as investors seek out the approaches that worked best in choppy markets, such as bets on price drops as well as gains.
HSBC said in a statement: "We anticipate greater volatility in 2014 and choppy markets as adjustments are made to changing economic circumstances and sentiment.
Wall Street has struggled with new regulations and choppy markets.
Averaging is not a better choice for choppy markets.
Summary: EURUSD Eoe1/4" Euro Short-term Forecast Neutral vs US Dollar GBPUSD Eoe1/4" British Pound Outlook Unclear in Choppy Markets USDJPY Eoe1/4" Japanese Yen Forecast to Gain.
With choppy markets therefore likely to dominate, and investors being forced to accept investment warnings that prices can fall as well as rise as being meaningful rather than a throwaway comment in a disclaimer, how can they look to exploit the opportunities that this new market is set to throw at them?
Mumbai: The writing on the wall for stock investors in India is: Brace for choppy markets as the focus shifts to an interim budget in the coming weeks and probable national elections in April-May.
Deutsche Bank spooked investors yesterday with unexpectedly weak earnings from trading securities in the second quarter, sparking fears that choppy markets could upset its results this year.
He knew Web Ship, an Internet-based shipping service, was a start-up, and that venture capitalists were looking to more advanced firms to place their investments, seeking smoother rides in today's choppy markets.
In choppy markets, the market-maker truly has to act as a principal, buying or selling securities from inventory, rather than as a crossing agent between two parties who have, unbeknownst to them, agreed on a price.