CFC

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CFC

Controlled Foreign Corporation

A company registered in and regulated by a foreign country that has at least 50% American ownership. Setting up a corporation in a foreign country may have tax advantages; for example, a country may encourage companies to register in it by having no corporate tax. The IRS works within the context of foreign treaties to determine how earnings from controlled foreign corporations are taxed in the United States.
References in periodicals archive ?
The firm's products use no chlorofluorocarbons and are actuated by heat sources such as gas, solar or waste heat.
GM has been very active in eliminating the use of chlorofluorocarbons at its plants and in new vehicles, and has accomplished the transition to R-134a in its mobile air conditioning systems, well before the phase-out.
Hydrogenated chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) could potentially be used as dispersion agents.
Project objectives : Destruction of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which are major ozone depleting substances; poverty reduction through the creation of jobs.
Redesigned asthma inhalers are being introduced as manufacturers begin phasing out the ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons that once helped propel asthma drugs into the lungs.
Mostly human-made chemicals called chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).
Although humanmade gases, such as chlorofluorocarbons, account for much of the stratospheric-ozone loss, production of those substances is being phased out.
15 to 17, also marked the 10th anniversary of the original international treaty to phase out ozone-destroying chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).
14 in Montreal in conjunction with the 10th anniversary of the signing of the landmark "Montreal Protocol" international agreement, which was designed to reduce and eventually eliminate the emissions of artificial ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).
won for its 10-year development of a process to make sheets of polystyrene foam that employs carbon dioxide instead of hydrocarbons or ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).
Although almost one-quarter could explain correctly how chlorofluorocarbons were believed to contribute to the thinning of stratospheric ozone, only about half of these adults could describe reasonably well where in the atmosphere this thinning is taking place.
manufacturers ceased production of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) for domestic consumption in all but a few "essential" uses, such as rocket motor manufacturing.