chartism

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chartism

the monitoring of price movements of financial securities such as STOCKS and SHARES and FOREIGN CURRENCIES as a means of indicating appropriate buying and selling positions. See SHARE PRICE INDEX, STOCK MARKET, FOREIGN EXCHANGE MARKET.
References in periodicals archive ?
the future of the Chartist movement and to continue to define his
The Occupy Wall Street movement, for example, has its general assemblies; much like the Chartist movement had its general assembly rooms.
The power and willingness of Parliament to shape the lives of the working class for the worse became a subject for a wide range of political commentators and journalists, including lames Bronterre O'Brien, William Lovett and James Watson, all of whom became prime movers in the Chartist movement.
The style and the accessibility of the text makes this a definitive account for anyone with a general interest in the Chartist movement, or for anybody embarking on a serious study of the movement itself.
Now volunteer tour guides will bring the cottage to life for visitors, talking about its history, how people used to live there and the Chartist movement.
The cartoon and accompanying "short biography" formed the first in a series of "Sketches of Female Politicians," but though Punch ridiculed Walker's subsequent lecture on the Constitution, it did not produce any further sketches, even though potential targets existed in the contemporary anti-Corn Law and anti-slavery societies as well as in the Chartist movement.
Where the Spencean interlude of the 1790s anchored the first half of the book, this second half is grounded in the exuberant flow of poetry through the Chartist movement of the 1830s and 1840s, and Janowitz shows how the interventionist poetics of Chartism developed "along two axes: that of ballad and song, and that of poetry shaped within the conventions of print-culture `aesthetic' poetry" (141).
This study is most engaging in the latter part of the book where the politics of the anti-Poor Law constituencies in the northern industrial counties of England are linked to the political practices and discourses of the nascent Chartist movement.
His second, Alton Locke (1850), is the story of a tailor-poet who becomes a leader of the Chartist movement (a British working-class movement for parliamentary reform).
Loose examines the literature of the Chartist Movement in 1830s Britain, arguing that imaginative literature can change the political and social history of a class and a nation.
In The Poetry of the Chartist Movement (1993), Ulrike Schwab has also embarked on a systematic ordering of the corpus of works.