Chapter 33

Chapter 33

A colloquial term that refers to a third Chapter 11 filing by a corporation.
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Chapter 33 of the report deals with 'Recommendations' where the Commissioners have set out 30 recommendations.
Further enhancements to Chapter 33 will better posture the Massachusetts National Guard to answer the call to duty for the Nation and the Commonwealth.
And Esau said, Let me now leave with thee some of the folk that are with me," it read, right there in Genesis, Chapter 33, and Avukia began wondering just who the folk in question may be.
Interestingly, the indefinite present tense, also known as a- tense, is described in Chapter 33 ('Additional tenses and their negation') rather than in Chapter 5 alongside the ordinary present tense; after all, the difference between the two is aspectual and is often ignored in real, ordinary usage.
A case in point is Chapter 33, "Irony," which analyzes a passage from Dickens' Nicholas Nickleby with different rhetorical and linguistic approaches.
The Nurse Practice Act Chapter 33 Sections [section]4033-34 (D)(2) and [section]40-33-34(H)(3) require the Board to conduct a random audit of approved written protocols and/or guidelines at least biennially.
Chapter 33 covers the topic of chemical, biological, and radiological weapons and warfare with information on definitions, history, and agents.
Speaking at a press conference after the meeting, Bert Koenders, Dutch Foreign Minister whose country holds the current EU Presidency said "today we will open the 16th chapter in the EU accession negotiations with Turkey, this is chapter 33 on financial and budgetary provisions.
Chapter 33 introduces us to '24 Wordless Artists You Should Know', with succinct biographies and lists of publications for those illustrators who feature most frequently.
Moreover, another European Commission spokesperson Maja Kocijancic said during the same briefing that the visit of Pierre Moscovici, European Commissioner for Economic and Financial Affairs, to Turkey had nothing to do with the opening of Chapter 33 on the budget and economic policy, the preparation of which is already done and is still up to date.
In place of a Bible reading copies of the story of Dinah, daughter of Leah taken from the book of Genesis chapter 33, were handed out and read by David who then asked for feedback on the story.
First, I will offer further evidence of the significance of the term weyssheyt in chapter 33.
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