Chaos Theory

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Related to Chaotic systems: Chaos theory

Chaos Theory

A theory stating that seemingly unrelated events affect each other in a predictable, mathematical way. In investing, chaos theory is used to predict future stock prices using information that does not seem to affect prices directly, such as trading volume and trader sentiment. Computing these factors using chaos theory is as complex as it is controversial.
References in periodicals archive ?
The chaotic system was generated using Logistic map.
Nevertheless chaotic systems show one degree of discipline that is able to short term forecast as commitment and principal models.
In this paper, we only focus on binary64 floating-point format, which is generally used to achieve a higher simulation precision for the study of chaotic systems.
By the theory of CNN, the paper put forward a technology to encrypt image based on chaotic system which is generated by CNN.
The inherent property of robustness of a Fuzzy Logic System (FLS) makes it an efficient forecaster for chaotic systems.
They selected desired patterns from the infinite variety offered by a chaotic system.
The idea of synchronizing two identical chaotic systems was first introduced by Carroll and Pecora [1-2].
disagrees with physicist-theologian John Polkinghorne over the proper understanding of chaotic systems.
In 1990, pecora and carroll proposed a successful method to synchronize two identical chaotic systems with different initial conditions [1].
In other calculations, the researchers found that with some basic tweaks in the design, the new class of metamaterials could also model chaotic systems, such as disordered planetary motions, by inducing chaos in electromagnetic waves.
Sir Ian Kennedy, chairman of the Healthcare Commission, said yesterday: "This is a shocking story of appalling standards of care and chaotic systems for looking after patients - words I have not previously used in any report.
Commission chairman Sir Ian Kennedy said: "Our report tells a story of appalling standards of care and chaotic systems for looking after patients.