Chaos Theory

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Chaos Theory

A theory stating that seemingly unrelated events affect each other in a predictable, mathematical way. In investing, chaos theory is used to predict future stock prices using information that does not seem to affect prices directly, such as trading volume and trader sentiment. Computing these factors using chaos theory is as complex as it is controversial.
References in periodicals archive ?
19(a)-(d) show spreading, no clear indication appears about nature of chaotic motion and three-dimensional spreading of the particle path for the cases pointed out above.
While Alex Turner and his bandmates - with the exception of furious drummer Matt Helder - work their way through song after song, their fans are an ever-exuberant mass of chaotic motion.
Following a logical profession from the lower part of the body (leg compressions), up to the arm and wrist (finger compressions), and ending at the neck (choke holds), Petrillie goes on to teach the viewer how to access these locks from both the chaotic motion of a fight and from a standing position after an opponent has been softened up through some strikes.
The time-periodic variation of speed (of circular rotors) utilized in this study to produce chaotic motion of fluid elements is not unique.
Under the intoxicating influence of nonlinearity, only a few degrees of freedom are necessary to generate chaotic motion.
All the necessary ingredients for chaotic motion are present in the equations.
The developed theory is linked to fractals in the sense of Mandelbrot (1983) because truly chaotic motion often possesses the intricate geometry of the fractal.
This talk will present a simplified two dimensional animated model of Hyperion's more complicated full three dimensional motion which, although not capable of showing chaotic motion (three dimensions are required for chaos in a physical system) does show how a driving torque of Saturn's tidal force functions.
Their evidence indicated, for the first time, that a body moving through a fluid could have chaotic motion.