screening

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Screen Stocks

To investigate stocks for potential investment according to a predetermined set of criteria. For example, an investor may screen stocks according to the lowest price, the most market capitalization, the most favorable price-earnings ratio, or any number of other variables. One may also combine criteria while screening stocks. The process is designed to help one make the best investment decisions, and is often accomplished with the help of a computer.

screening

the process of evaluating product ideas in terms of consumer acceptance, technical feasibility and cost. See NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT.
References in periodicals archive ?
11) Furthermore, the risk for abnormal cervical cytology is significantly increased with persistent HPV infection with high-risk types, and regression of lesions is often delayed by persistence of infection.
Two-thirds of the laboratories (444 of 666) routinely include an educational note in cervical cytology reports.
Women were referred to the study from community practice if they had cervical cytology results showing ASCUS or LSIL.
A thin coat of water-soluble gel on the external vaginal speculum blade surfaces did hot compromise the adequacy or interpretation of cervical cytology.
The guidelines from both organizations are similar in most respects; unlike previous recommendations, they delay initial screening and recognize a reduced need for annual cervical cytology tests in low-risk women.
USPSTF Recommendations (2012) Women 21-29 Screen every 3 years with cervical cytology years old (Pap) alone Women 30-65 Screen with a combination of cytology and human years old papillomavirus (HPV) testing every 5 years Table 2.
A CERVICAL CANCER screening interval of 5 years or longer may be safe for women with one or more negative cotests using the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) test and cervical cytology, according to the results of a large observational study.
Conventional method was thought to be getting more of confounding factors along with cells from cervix, but both the methods are considered equally reliable for detecting changes in cervical cytology.
The Task Force continues to recommend that women in their 20s be screened every 3 years via cervical cytology, but in a change from the 2012 recommendations, the researchers now advise clinicians to offer women aged 30-65 years a choice of either cytology every 3 years or the high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) test every 5 years as a method of screening for cervical cancer.
A large observational study has found that testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) in women with abnormal cervical cytology leads to faster diagnosis of cervical disease and fewer missed cases.
Prior information notice without call for competition: NHS England Midlands and East (West Midlands) Cervical Cytology Screening