Casuistry


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Casuistry

1. In law, the act of applying a rule or principle to a theoretical situation in order to see how it holds up.

2. In law, the act of generalizing an unusual situation in order to form a rule or principle based on it.

3. Derogatory, faulty reasoning.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kallendorf understands this to the extent that her study speaks of the Spanish Comedia as casuistry, and it certainly takes into account key aspects of theater.
In the discourse of fundamentalism, the contents and references of faith are such mediations of the community as the Bible, the inherited cosmology, the casuistry.
Enhanced with illustrations by Erik Wilson, this impressive anthology is comprised of The Coliseum (Patrick Lestewka); No We Love No One (Gerard Houarner); Casuistry (Charlee Jacob); Damned If You Do (Jack Ketchum); Green Green Glass (John Everson); When The Bough Doesn't Break (Brian Hodge); Thief of Golgotha (Tom Piccirilli); Siren (Jeffrey Thomas); The Angel (Edward Lee); Close (Mehitobel Wilson); That and the Rain (Gary Bruanbeck); and Nexus of Crisis (Doc Solammen).
Turning away from debates about norms and intrinsically evil acts, Christian ethicists have more recently focused on virtues and a revival of casuistry.
Take a deep breath, count to 10, and leave casuistry to the Jesuits.
Cheekily, and with great casuistry, counsel for WDC had the nerve to claim that the closely argued letters of objection from CLARA and the Leamington Society, which he now belatedly conceded presented the correct interpretation, meant that the councillors on the planning committee by 'paradox or fluke' had the facts of the law before them.
63) Camille Slights has observed that, while "Roman Catholic casuistry was designed to guide the clergy in the confessional," "Protestantism assumes that ultimately everyone is his own casuist and must think through every moral doubt for himself.
He states that controversy on the extent of the subsidy has been "marked by a deplorable amount of casuistry insofar as the contentions are purportedly grounded in economics" but that the market test is there-"it has not been an accident that when telephone markets were opened it was to the latter [longdistance] markets that competitors flocked" (p.
1400 reflects renewed interest in the kind of courtly love casuistry made popular by Machaut some fifty years earlier, and whose dedications reveal the importance of the economics of patronage for an ambitious female writer obliged to earn her living by her pen (the poems are dedicated respectively to Louis d'Orleans, Jean de Werchin, and a male person unnamed).
The anthropologist wants to keep it at the level of specific rules to illustrate the vast differences between moral systems: I want to move quickly to general features of moral systems to illustrate how they are all fundamentally about the same things, even if the casuistry differentiates them.
To defending the bloating of the IRS's tax gap figures by including amounts that the IRS itself concedes are wrong -- or that a court so adjudicates -- on the grounds that IRS agents could have made more adjustments is casuistry.
Despite the multiple ironies of such a situation, my aim is not to single out The Heath Anthology or its editors for their apparent casuistry, but merely to suggest that these are complex times that often have the effect of clouding the ethics of choices that are made on any side of a given issue--a fact that should make each of us wary of those arguments in support of things or ideas that are offered to us because they're morally correct or for our own good.