Cargo


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Cargo

Goods being transported.

Cargo

Anything being transported, especially if it is to be sold later.

cargo

see FREIGHT.

freight

or

cargo

goods that are in the process of being physically transported from a factory or depot to a customer by road, rail, sea or air, involving both domestically and internationally traded goods. The movement of goods may be done by the supplier's own distribution division or by independent fleet operators and FREIGHT FORWARDERS. See C. I. F., F. O. B.
References in classic literature ?
This cargo was consigned to a Whitby solicitor, Mr.
Asked me questions about the vessel, the time she left Marseilles, the course she had taken, and what was her cargo.
I found the dear old Lady Jermyn on the very eve of sailing, with a new captain, a new crew, a handful of passengers (chiefly steerage), and nominally no cargo at all.
I've known men come on shore for a few hours while their ship was taking in cargo, and never go back.
Nothing of this was missed by Dag Daughtry, who knew a dog when he saw one, as he studied Michael in the light of the lanterns held by black boys where the whaleboats were landing cargo.
That he knew his business his owners were convinced, or at forty he would not have held command of the Tryapsic, three thousand tons net register, with a cargo capacity of nine thousand tons and valued at fifty-thousand pounds.
The Peddler saw through his trick and drove him for the third time to the coast, where he bought a cargo of sponges instead of salt.
On his way back, as he rode towards the village, he saw that she had indeed anchored, and that many boats were round her, bearing cargo to the shore.
Sometimes they were found unattended and dead in their beds; on occasion their bodies were dragged out of the water; and sometimes it was just plain accident, as when Bill Kelley, unloading cargo while drunk, had a finger jerked off, which, under the circumstances, might just as easily have been his head.
During the first few days they were busy discharging the cargo brought by the flotilla, the machines, and the rations, as well as a large number of huts constructed of iron plates, separately pieced and numbered.
In a troop each animal carries on a level road, a cargo weighing 416 pounds
The Nan-Shan was on her way from the southward to the treaty port of Fu-chau, with some cargo in her lower holds, and two hundred Chinese coolies returning to their village homes in the province of Fo-kien, after a few years of work in various tropical colonies.