Capitalization ratios

Capitalization ratios

Also called financial leverage ratios, these ratios compare debt to total capitalization and thus reflect the extent to which a corporation is trading on its equity. Capitalization ratios can be interpreted only in the context of the stability of industry and company earnings and cash flow.

Leverage Ratio

In risk analysis, any ratio that measures a company's leverage. One example of a gearing ratio is the long-term debt/capitalization ratio, which is calculated by taking the company's long-term debt and dividing it by its long-term debt added to its preferred and common stock. Another example is a simple debt-to-equity ratio, which is calculated by dividing total debt by total equity. Generally, companies with higher leverage as determined by a leverage ratio are thought to be more risky because they have more liabilities and less equity. A leverage ratio is also called a gearing ratio or an equity multiplier.
References in periodicals archive ?
Focusing on current capitalization ratios, without understanding the extent to which the market-oriented nature of capital has become a critical aspect of the competitive scene, can potentially weaken the industry as much as any other competitive disadvantage.