Capitalist

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Capitalist

A person who believes in or is involved with an economic system in which the means of production are privately held. In capitalism, the most important of the means of production is money, rather than land (as in feudalism) or labor (as in socialism). That is, the ability to raise and use money for the production of goods and services is more important than owning the land from which goods come, or the ability to work in order to create a good or service. As a result, government policies generally target the regulation (or not) of money and its uses rather than those of property and/or labor. While capitalism is often associated with laissez-faire policies, governments in capitalist countries often involve themselves. The appropriate amount of government intervention in a capitalist system remains hotly debated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Saving Capitalism from the capitalist by Hartmut Elsenhans argues that a lack of perception of the progressive aspects of capitalism has resulted into policy measures that have frequently been defeated.
Over the following one and a quarter century, China was incorporated into the capitalist world system and suffered massive and sustained declines.
The novel opens with a portrayal of the superior financial and social status of the capitalists (Ghose, 1998).
A member of the venture capitalist tribe yesterday asserted that those of his ilk would continue to be on the lookout for the next "fantastic idea that will radically change the world".
The web site reveals complaints of venture capitalists being arrogant, duplicitous, and even possibly stealing ideas.
The move came as ever more venture capitalists circle the supermarket group, threatening the prospect of a takeover battle.
Such conferences are a kind of audition, he explains, "where you pay a modest fee of $500 to $1,500 and get 10 minutes to make a presentation in front of a group of venture capitalists.
Even using the idea is a small victory for business thinking and the capitalist way.
In the more developed economies of the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States, venture capitalists have filled this gap by providing capital to early stage ventures with good growth potential (Wright & Robbie, 1998).
After about a century of consolidation, England's agrarian capitalists launched a series of foreign ventures, colonies they peopled with the landless laborers created by their landed fathers and grandfathers.