Capitalist

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Related to Capitalists: communism, socialism, Capitalist System, Venture capitalists

Capitalist

A person who believes in or is involved with an economic system in which the means of production are privately held. In capitalism, the most important of the means of production is money, rather than land (as in feudalism) or labor (as in socialism). That is, the ability to raise and use money for the production of goods and services is more important than owning the land from which goods come, or the ability to work in order to create a good or service. As a result, government policies generally target the regulation (or not) of money and its uses rather than those of property and/or labor. While capitalism is often associated with laissez-faire policies, governments in capitalist countries often involve themselves. The appropriate amount of government intervention in a capitalist system remains hotly debated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Keller concluded, “Women have to perceive themselves as capitalists to establish real power and influence.
Venture capitalists have a target of seven to ten times the return on investment so we have a different risk profile," he said.
He is so wary of powerful venture capitalists that he remained anonymous until last month.
The GMB union has hit out at tax relief on loans used by venture capitalists to buy companies such as the AA and bid for Sainsbury's.
3 million in "angel" investments--money from wealthy individuals who frequently are organized into investment pools--by early 2005 and could boast a dozen customers and $300,000 in revenues, it was stymied: venture capitalists were balking.
As a result, capitalists are always looking to the future.
Study Reveals Exit Strategies, Financing Rounds and Management Issues Are Top of Mind Among 700 Venture Capitalists and Company CEOs
SAN FRANCISCO - Venture capitalists curtailed their investments in the third quarter, suggesting the financiers who bankrolled the dot-com boom are taking a more sober approach to the revived interest in high-tech startups.
2] By the sixteenth century agrarian capitalists in England began evicting peasant farmers from traditional locations and relationships, beginning the transformation of peasants (small farmers who worked as Little as twenty-five acres) into disenfranchised unskilled workers with nothing to sell but their own labor.
President Jiang Zemin had also raised hopes by suggesting that not only capitalists, but believers, could become party members.
economy and the aftermath of the Internet gold rush have venture capitalists (VCs) thinking twice before investing in entrepreneurial ventures.