Campaign Finance Law

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Campaign Finance Law

Any law governing who may contribute or how much may be contributed to a political campaign. For example, a campaign finance law may prohibit corporations from donating more than $1,000 to a campaign. Campaign finance laws are fairly controversial in the United States.
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Two competing bills were proposed that addressed the question of how the campaign finance laws apply to communications on the Internet.
An observer watching Vermont's campaign finance laws might feel as though they were watching a tennis match as the case was volleyed back and forth between the U.
We filed it away because our attorney advised us that by law we cannot change the campaign finance laws as they presently exist in the state of California,'' said Councilman Bob Kellar.
And just as Cannon could claim he didn't intend to violate campaign finance laws, Metzler can maintain that he didn't intend to commit identity theft.
If politically active 527s are treated like political parties, as McCain wants, people completely uninvolved with the lawmaking and campaign fund raising process likely would be judged by McCain-Feingold's "federal election activity" standard designed for political parties, even though the groups are incapable of the quid pro quo corruption the original campaign finance laws were designed to combat.
McCain, Feingold, Shays and Meehan contend that the FEC has been more concerned with protecting the interests of political insiders than in enforcing campaign finance laws, and that the commission is too often deadlocked along partisan lines.
Supreme Court rejected the contention that nonprofit organizations should be exempt from campaign finance laws banning corporate contributions to candidates in federal campaigns.
These run the gamut from the loophole-ridden campaign finance laws, to the front-loaded nomination calendar, to the haphazard delegate selection process, to the roll-of-the-dice culture of vice-presidential selection, to the made-for-TV conventions that have airbrushed the politics out of politics.
Starting with Citizens United, Chief Justice Roberts and his conservative colleagues have been systematically dismantling our nation's campaign finance laws, ensuring that only the richest Americans will have a say in the political process.
DeLay, a Sugar Land Republican, was convicted almost two years ago on charges that he conspired to violate campaign finance laws and that he and the Texans for a Republican Majority PAC, or TRMPAC, laundered money by swapping corporate contributions that couldn't be used for campaigns for non-corporate donations that could be used.
Mark Montiel is suing Troy King, his opponent in the race for the Republican primary for attorney general, claiming that King violated state campaign finance laws by setting up a PAC in Washington, D.
However, challenges to these two important campaign finance laws continue in 2006.

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