Byline


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Byline

In journalism, the text usually immediately below the headline giving the name, company and/or position of an article's writer.
References in periodicals archive ?
E14: The byline should read "Faruqui S, Palacios E, Friedlander P, Melgar M, Alvernia J, Parry PV" [corrected to add omitted author's name--Faruqui S].
Some of them we pick up the byline as it was run in the wire, but other ones we run the generic AP byline.
Which begs other questions: How does one get a job at a newspaper if he can't even work the byline policy?
Johnson explains that the translation of marketing bylines requires a special skill and understanding of a company's desired message.
For Hark, working with Sports Byline USA is an opportunity we couldn't pass up," said David Aronchick, Hark CEO and co-founder.
Nick Bonsanto brings his show to Sports Byline USA after a career that started in the 80's in the NJ/Philadelphia area and spent the past few years at ESPN 105.
We're excited to expand our audio services to Sports Byline USA listeners and offer them access to their favorite mobile programming," said Tony Philipp, UpSNAP CEO.
Now, Democrat-Gazette stories get datelines if a reporter wasn't there and a byline isn't warranted, Fellone said.
Even though he's "certainly written stories I'd be happy to have my name on," DePaul has been resolute (except once in 2001, when he put his byline on an obituary) so as to "be a reminder to the union that this is something to consider.
The company's service has been in Beta testing with Sports Byline USA since October of 2005.
I'D like to see Djibril Cisse forget about scoring goals and just make it to the byline with the ball and get it into the box.
Suffice it to say that, 20 years later, on press row at any big game in town, there's likely to be someone whose byline showed up in the credits for ``Fever Pitch.