Business School

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Business School

A college that offers undergraduate and/or postgraduate degrees representing study of business. These schools offer theoretical, and perhaps also practical, coursework in how to manage a company, construct a business model and generally run a business. In business school, one may concentrate in fields like accounting, entrepreneurship, finance, marketing and supply chain management, among others. See also: Masters of business administration, Bachelor of business administration.
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All the region's business schools will no doubt wish to argue that this critique of business schools does not apply to them.
Professor Sir Andrew Likierman, dean of London Business School, said: "We are very proud to have retained the top spot.
Deans and business school presidents from more than 150 countries were asked to recommend a number of business schools and the palms are awarded based on those recommendations.
Too often, the corporate world, with its higher-paying salaries and perks, is a "strong lure," Light says, and business schools "need to think carefully about how to develop and broaden the pipeline of qualified candidates.
Before MLT, he had looked at business schools based on their rankings, but Walker, 28, says the program helped him understand the importance of visiting schools and talking with students to decide on the best fit for him.
Ethics and corporate responsibility are important components of executive education programs at most leading business schools, in response to the changing nature of the world's investment and business environment.
Percentage of Canadian business executives who feel that Canadian business schools are superior to American business schools: 6
An American Council of Education report shows that business schools, with the exception of medical schools, had the highest percentage of full-time non-tenure track faculty, and that part-time business faculty were close to 50 percent of the total in 1998.
Now in its second year, the list is based on what corporate recruiters think of the nation's business schools and their graduates.