Bush Doctrine


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Bush Doctrine

A neoconservative foreign policy idea in the United States. It is most commonly associated with efforts to prevent future terrorist attacks on the United States through the invasion of foreign countries thought to be safe havens for terrorist groups. It is also used to express regime change, or the attempt to replace a dictatorship with a fledgling democracy. More generally, the term describes American unilateralism.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Bush doctrine is basically characterized by unilateralism and preemptive strikes.
The ten selections that make up the main body of the text are devoted to the relationship between presidents and foreign policy, the limits of American power, understanding the Bush doctrine, globalization as a security strategy, and a wide variety of other related subjects.
However, by the end of Bush's (II) second term, the American public was exhausted with the Bush Doctrine.
Obama," and says his ISIS strategy, so far, mimics the Bush doctrine in acknowledging that the war will be long, fought on a global stage, and justified by the need to hit extremists in the Middle East before they can attack the United States.
That was precisely the aspect of the Bush Doctrine that led to the overreach that cost so much in blood and treasure that Nau decries.
When the so-called Bush Doctrine was established with the release of the National Security Strategy on September 20, 2002, its promise to "act against such emerging threats [nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons] before they are fully formed" was viewed by many as a radical overhaul of US national security doctrine, but Warren (Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia) argues that the Bush Doctrine's statements on counter-proliferation and preventive war were merely explicit statements of concepts that have been implicit in previous administrations' National Security Strategy releases extending back to the end of World War II.
Its label then (and my answer) was "the Bush Doctrine.
National Security in the Obama Administration: Reassessing the Bush Doctrine.
The Bush doctrine also stipulated that threats should be confronted by striking preemptively, and on the basis of suspicion alone.
Others argue that versions of the Bush Doctrine of forced democratization and unilateral strike have been refashioned rather than abandoned by the Obama administration in the conduct of its foreign policy.
Obama would pursue the Bush doctrine of spreading freedom as one of the main tools for fighting extremism.