Burn

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Burn

1. In printing, the time at which an image is put on a plate.

2. In film, a ghost of an image that remains after the image has disappeared.
References in classic literature ?
The play-hour in the evening I thought the pleasantest fraction of the day at Lowood: the bit of bread, the draught of coffee swallowed at five o'clock had revived vitality, if it had not satisfied hunger: the long restraint of the day was slackened; the schoolroom felt warmer than in the morning--its fires being allowed to burn a little more brightly, to supply, in some measure, the place of candles, not yet introduced: the ruddy gloaming, the licensed uproar, the confusion of many voices gave one a welcome sense of liberty.
But Burns had no money; the brothers' farm had not prospered, and Jean's father, a stern old Scotsman, would have nothing to say to Robert, who was in his opinion a bad man, and a wild, unstable, penniless rimester.
This he did, and the book was such a success that instead of going to Jamaica as an unknown exile Burns went to Edinburgh to be entertained, feted, and flattered by the greatest men of the day.
But in spite of all the flattery, Burns, though pleased and glad, remained as simple as before.
After spending a brilliant winter in Edinburgh, Burns set off on several tours through his native land, visiting many of the places famous in Scottish history.
But farming and song-making did not seem to go together, and on his new farm Burns succeeded little better than on any that he had tried before.
Burns sighed, glanced at me inquisitively, as much as to say, "Aren't you going yet?
Burns mustered his courage one day and remonstrated earnestly with the captain.
Burns at this point looked at me with an air of curiosity.
Burns had had no personal knowledge of that affair, but positive evidence of it existed in the shape of a photograph taken in Haiphong.
Burn it without looking at it, and without opening it, so that its contents may for ever remain unknown to yourself.
So he takes his bow and arrows, and getting on horseback, he rides away from our rear directly, as it were back to Nertsinskay; after this he takes a great circuit about, and comes directly on the army of the Tartars as if he had been sent express to tell them a long story that the people who had burned the Cham Chi-Thaungu were gone to Sibeilka, with a caravan of miscreants, as he called them--that is to say, Christians; and that they had resolved to burn the god Scal-Isar, belonging to the Tonguses.