Census Bureau

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Census Bureau

A division under the Department of Commerce that collects data on the population, demographics, and economics in the United States. The Census Bureau is required to conduct an exhaustive survey of the U.S. population at least once every 10 years; this determines the apportionment of seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. However, it also provides a great deal of useful information on the state of the American economy. For example, it publishes figures on the trade balance. See also: The Conference Board.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bureau of the Census, Characteristics of New Housing: 2006
Bureau of the Census, Census 2000 summary fire 3 (SF3): Sex by educational attainment for the population 25 years and older (P148H), <http://factfinder.
Bureau of the Census, September 1999 ("Family Type" and "Educational Attainment" for All Races, Black, White, and Hispanic); U.
Bureau of the Census, Current Population Reports, Series P20-475.
The United States Bureau of the Census has again turned to a Long Island based company to provide critically important data capture technology necessary to ensure that the 2010 Census is the most accurate in American history.
Bureau of the Census (2003) defines family and household as separate categories.
Bureau of the Census, Poverty status in 1999 of families by family type by presence of related children under 18 years by age of related children, American FactFinder Detailed Tables, 2000, <http:// factfinder.
Bureau of the Census, 1996), divorce has become a frequent occurrence in American society.
Bureau of the Census [Ouintile Annual Family Real Income Distribution 1948-1996] seem to indicate that "education "--at least through the 80th percentile of population--does not result in an overall increase in inflation-adjusted (real) income, but rather a redistribution of income within this group, thus resulting in no net gain in overall income.
Nonresponse follow-up--where Bureau of the Census enumerators went door-to-door to count individuals who did not mail back their questionnaires--was the most costly and labor intensive of all 2000 Census operations.
The updating of source data for IP in the 2001 annual revision will include annual data from the 1999 Bureau of the Census Annual Survey of Manufactures and from selected editions of its 1999 and 2000 Current Industrial Reports.
Kenneth Prewitt, director of the United States Bureau of the Census.

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