Bundling


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Bundling

1. The practice of selling multiple products as if they were one. For example, all seven books in the Harry Potter series may be bundled and sold as a box set.

2. The practice of compiling a number of financial products and selling them as securities. Mortgages are frequently bundled as mortgage-backed securities.
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the last two decades, bundling has become an increasingly prevalent topic of Industrial Organisation research, as it creates a host of new competitive and regulatory challenges.
First, it's important to think about what bundling really is and why it's worth considering.
The first holds senior management accountable for eliminating unnecessary contract bundling and mitigating the effects of necessary and justified bundling.
However, these conservative and controlling aspects of bundling are not a twentieth-century innovation.
The third, bundling with profits and sales objectives, is to maximize profits only if sales do not decline.
Thus, soft dollars appear to be an innovative form of organization that achieves the benefits of bundling wile allowing reseach and execution to be efficiently produced by specialized firms.
Thus, the seller selects either simple monopoly pricing or some form of commodity bundling in selling goods 1 and 2.
The main drawback for customers in service bundling is loss of clarity
Recent In-Stat research, "The SMB/Branch Office Service Bundle Enhanced By IMS" (#IN0602855WWI), covers the market for small business and small branch office telecom services bundling.
In the US, in the Telecom Act environment which was marked by the reintegration of long distance services, the RBOCs have been able to handle the swift decline in their landline telephone base by adopting a proactive stance on bundling over the past three years.