Bund

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Bund

A bond issued by the federal government of Germany. Because it is guaranteed by the federal government, it is considered the safest asset in Germany. See also: U.S. Treasury security.
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Pebble bunding was done in two acres of her land with the assistance from Watershed Programme.
The Mount Alexina 1 scatter (Figure 3) is exposed along a terrace on the south-west side of Bunding Creek (a small spring-fed tributary stream of Hughes Creek) on the property of Mount Alexina.
Some of the most common issues to arise for producers are site identification boards, bunding, records and reporting.
The company also provides load bank testing, power analysis and consultancy, fuel management/tank bunding as well as routine and emergency maintenance of L.
Over the past thirty-odd years, the EGS has provided a substantial amount of demand-led manual employment through labor-intensive public works (roads, percolation tanks, contour and 'nala' bunding, horticulture-linked works), especially during off-season periods of low employment opportunities.
Richard Ninnes, CCW's specialist support team manager, said the agency was consulted about the bunding and under-grounding projects.
British Pipeline Agency, one of the firms using the depot, were told their bunding - installations to catch spillages around tanks - was not adequate.
Triumph Motorcyles, Dodwells Bridge Ind-ustrial Estate, Hinckley - external roller shutter to east (front) elevation of factory and additional landscape bunding (Triumph Motorcycles Ltd)
These techniques consist of three main elements: leveling (to make the field bed flat, so as to keep the water-level equal, involving usually tilling, puddling, or trampling), bunding (to surround the field with dykes), and inundating (to fill the field with water, not only rain water, but water supplied by a constant source).
It would also encourage them to maintain and improve bunding systems (barriers built along contour lines that prevent water runoff and spread rainwater evenly across fields), and to shift to more efficient irrigation practices.
Only rarely are they placed on the floodplain itself, in part because of the far more elaborate bunding needed to protect them from floods and in part because the floodplain is considered too valuable for recession cultivation.
Alexander Popov, the head of the Moscow Soviet's press center, was luckier; the security guards led him out of the surrounded bunding.