Buck the Trend

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Buck the Trend

To perform well when the market as a whole is doing poorly, or, rarely to perform badly when the market as a whole is doing well. Bucking the trend may apply to individual securities or to whole industries. In technical analysis, bucking the trend is often seen as a bullish signal, as it indicates that investors are still interested in the security or industry involved despite the downtrend in the rest of the market.
References in periodicals archive ?
PRODUCTION levels among Britain's main dairy breeds fell last year, but less common breeds bucked the trend.
Managing partner James Mattin said: "We are seeing a huge demand for both offices and retail units and we have bucked the trend by adapting our available office space to meet demand.
And, despite the wider economic malaise, Mr Watson-James said lettings in the last year bucked the trend.
San Fernando Valley schools bucked the trend, with all grade levels ratcheting up the number of schools that received a ranking of 6 or above on the state's 1-to-10 scale, according to results released Tuesday.
NEW car sales dropped by two per cent in September, but one Scottish dealership bucked the trend big time.
In late August, MetLife bucked the trend of life insurers dumping their major "trophy" real estate holdings by acquiring the Sears Tower in Chicago, the tallest building in North America.
Lucy O'Carroll, of the Royal Bank of Scotland, said: "Increased output and employment in the North-east bucked the trend seen across the UK as a whole in April.
However, Smack the Pony soon, er, bucked the trend with three sexy comediennes - Sally Phillips, Doon Mackichan (pictured) and Fiona Allen - and some sharp scripts.
Some markets bucked the trend and witnessed vacancy drops, including Boston (6.
Results of PLASTICS TECHNOLOGY'S latest quarterly survey show that rates dropped more sharply in the South Central and Western regions, while the Northeast bucked the trend and achieved a four-point increase in average hourly rates - mainly for machine sizes under 300 tons.
That view was endorsed by the director of the National Institutes of Health, Harold Varmus, who bucked the trend among federal officials by telling a congressional committee March 5 that human cloning might be acceptable in the case of infertile couples who desire genetically related offspring.
7%) bucked the trend, while warm winter weather in the Northeast clearly showed in Sunoco's 19.