Bubble Economy

Bubble Economy

An economy market in which prices for goods and services rise far above actual values. This trend continues until investors realize just how far prices have risen, usually but not always resulting in a sharp decline. Bubbles usually occur when investors, for any number of reasons, believe that demand in the economy will continue to rise far beyond what is sustainable. This results in the increased prices. See also: Bubble.
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4, 1990, during the heyday of the asset-inflated bubble economy in Japan.
FALSE PROFITS: RECOVERING FROM THE BUBBLE ECONOMY provides an outstanding survey of how the unlimited housing bubble was the biggest economic blunder in the history of the world, leading to the recent collapse of the financial system.
Cargill and Sakamoto then turn their attention to the government's response to the collapse of the bubble economy by focusing on what has come to be known as Japan's lost decade.
It will be the first time for new graduates to be mobilized as factory workers since February 1990 during Japan's asset-inflated bubble economy.
Despite harsh economic conditions for more than a decade since the bursting of the bubble economy in Japan, we were able to strengthen our balance sheet and simultaneously grow our Automobile Operations and Real Estate-Related Finance segments, and other new busi-ness fields.
However, with the bursting of the bubble economy and various market changes, Japanese companies are looking beyond new domestic opportunities and seeking new markets, in particular, the gaishikei [foreign-affiliated companies] market.
We are satisfying our excessive demands by consuming the Earth's natural assets, in effect creating a global bubble economy.
It experienced less of a bubble economy and benefits from a weak currency.
The relocation plan was approved by the Diet in 1990 during the asset-inflated bubble economy when land prices were exceptionally high.
18 million yen registered in April 1987, the heyday of the bubble economy.
Katsumi alleges the three recklessly caused the union to provide loans to real estate firms and other businesses with no prospect of getting repaid during the so-called bubble economy period from the mid-1980s to early 1990s.
Such approaches mark a distinct retreat from the frenetic styling that characterized architecture in the era of the bubble economy.