Bricks


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Bricks

In auto sales, a house or other residence put up as collateral on a loan for an automobile.
References in classic literature ?
She bade her friends good-bye, and again started along the road of yellow brick.
Carey told him to put the bricks away at once, and stood over him while Philip did so.
But she's an old brick," said Alfred, rising from his chair, and pulling Mary's head backward to kiss her.
I was surprised to see how thirsty the bricks were which drank up all the moisture in my plaster before I had smoothed it, and how many pailfuls of water it takes to christen a new hearth.
But they didn't think to ask, bein' too full of bricks.
Thirty years later, only the thick walls were standing, with the dull red brick showing here and there through a matted growth of clinging vines.
The timbers beneath are of a peculiar strength, fitted to sustain the weight of an almost solid mass of brick and mortar, some ten feet by eight square, and five in height.
All along the streets, on both sides, at the outer edge of the brick sidewalks, stood locust trees with trunks protected by wooden boxing, and these furnished shade for summer and a sweet fragrancer in spring, when the clusters of buds came forth.
The brick house looks just the same as you have told us.
I was glad to be thus reminded of a purpose, long entertained, of visiting and rambling over the mansion of the old royal governors of Massachusetts; and entering the arched passage, which penetrated through the middle of a brick row of shops, a few steps transported me from the busy heart of modern Boston into a small and secluded courtyard.
He often told his wife that, some time or other, he should be very rich, and would build a "fair brick house" in the Green Lane of Boston.
The gabled brick, tile, and freestone houses had almost dried off for the season their integument of lichen, the streams in the meadows were low, and in the sloping High Street, from the West Gateway to the mediaeval cross, and from the mediaeval cross to the bridge, that leisurely dusting and sweeping was in progress which usually ushers in an old-fashioned market-day.