Brand Attitude

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Brand Attitude

The consensus attitude of potential consumers toward a product. Brand association refers to what the consumers believe the product does, how well it does it, and how likely they are to find it useful. Knowledge of a product's brand association is developed through market research such as asking focus groups. It is used in preparing advertising campaigns for products.
References in periodicals archive ?
41 for models that examined fan identification, as well as product involvement, brand attitudes, and personality traits of drivers.
2, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- The CHILDWISE Monitor is a comprehensive annual report focused on children's and teenagers' media consumption, brand attitudes and key behaviour, now in its 21st year.
Brand attitudes and brand superiority are extremely correlated each other and generate in that while they both communicate with the consumer's aggregate cognitive evaluation of a target brand.
Kardes (1988) found that brand attitude formed in the case of open-ended ads viewed by highly involved consumers were as favorable as brand attitudes formed with closed-ended ads but were much more accessible than the latter.
Brand attitudes are important because they often form the basis for consumer behavior by leading to intentions and afterwards to actual behavior (Fishbein and Ajzen 1975).
Our study aims at providing an integrative framework that encompasses both cognitive and affective determinants of brand attitudes in the field of advertising effectiveness.
Washington, Sept 4 (ANI): Researchers at The University of Texas, Austin, have indicated that embedding advertisements in violent video games leads to lower brand recall and negative brand attitudes.
This study was successful in demonstrating that an individual's perceptions of an activity lead to a mental state that creates positive brand attitudes and subsequent purchase intentions.
A Bonferoni Post-hoc test showed that brand attitudes in the text-only condition (3.
Finally, by not only studying advertising and brand attitudes but also incorporating and measuring intent to a ask a doctor and price perceptions, our research tries to provide a more comprehensive approach to the study of consumers' response to DTC advertising.
In addition, work on advertising evaluation, in particular the role of attention and preexisting brand attitudes on information processing/evaluation, is also drawn upon (MacInnis & Jaworski, 1989).
The combined respondent profile reveals an online campaign's true impact, from ad exposure and brand attitudes, to actual purchase behavior.