Brand Attitude

Brand Attitude

The consensus attitude of potential consumers toward a product. Brand association refers to what the consumers believe the product does, how well it does it, and how likely they are to find it useful. Knowledge of a product's brand association is developed through market research such as asking focus groups. It is used in preparing advertising campaigns for products.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are few categories of branding and the aspects chose for this study which is brand awareness, brand associations, brand attitude, brand loyalty and brand activity.
For example, Ahearne, Gruen, and Saxton (2000) found that when the product was a complex topic such as a CD player, no difference in brand attitude was found between open-ended and closed-ended ads.
They measured the short-term effect on brand awareness, brand attitude, and behavioral disposition towards the category and the brand.
Brand attitude is defined as a consumer's overall evaluation of a brand whether it is good or bad (Mitchell and Olson 1981; Keller 1993).
The gist of all these models is that in the absence of motivation to process or low involvement condition, brand attitude is more likely to be formed or changed by heuristic processing and [A.
The impact of measurement context on the relationship between attitude toward the Ad and brand attitude for familiar brands.
By leveraging ACDelco's 'can do' brand attitude of All Makes, All Models, All Cars - the ' Yes' campaign supported ACDelco distributors and operators in re-positioning the brand.
After surfing, three dependent measures were assessed: brand attitude, website attitude, and smoking intent.
A study by Brown and Stayman (1992) also found a direct relationship between attitude toward the ad and brand attitude.
The result is a concept with which Toyota says it aims to reflect both the shift in values of customers in the C segment and its own optimistic brand attitude.
In addition to the tracking service, Unity will offer luxury marketers direct access to its affluent consumer panel to pose exclusive questions and gather brand attitude and awareness measures.
The first paper "Consumer Attitudes Towards Multi-Channel Retailers' Web Sites: the Role of Involvement, Brand Attitude, Internet Knowledge and Visit Duration," by George Balabanis and Nina Reynolds examines casual wear sites to study factors affecting attitudes toward multi-channel retailers' web sites.