Bracero


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Bracero

An agreement between the United States and Mexico whereby agricultural, industrial and other laborers from Mexico were permitted to enter the United States in order to work. The program came from an agreement between U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt and Mexican President Manuel Avila Camacho to help with the American labor shortage resulting from the war effort. It began in 1942 and ended in 1964.
References in periodicals archive ?
Accounts of the Bracero program show a similar situation of low wages, poor working conditions, and selective deportation or blacklisting of workers demanding the rights guaranteed them by their contracts (Calavita, 1992; Anderson, 1963; Galarza, 1964).
Covarrubias-Lopez came from Carranza, Jalisco, to Bakersfield in 1958 to pick beans and corn but wound up working in the bracero bunkhouse as a handyman.
Congress, soon after Proposition 187 was passed, to recommend the reintroduction of a bracero migrant program.
Bracero on personal recognizance with electronic monitoring or to set cash bail in an amount no higher than $5,000.
The H-2A visa program, like the Bracero program before it, has encouraged farmers to continue unsustainable farm-labor practices and even to expand their reliance on cheap alien labor rather than modernizing and mechanizing farm practices.
The pattern of desperation finding exploitation has characterized the history of America's laboring masses ever since--from 19th-century European migrant "wage slaves" in America's mills and mines right through to the Bracero program for imported Mexican agricultural workers in the 1940s through mid-1960s.
The Bracero program enacted in 1942 was a direct response to the U.
Ureca Bracero, 'El uso de la fuentes literarias, recursos retoricos y tecnicas de composicion en etopeyas sobre un mismo tema', in: E.
Also scrutinized is the history of how dominant corporate interests and the wealthiest members of America have used immigration policy to control labor--such as the bracero program, an individualized contract that subjects a guest worker to deportation at the employer's relative discretion; such "guest worker" programs actually give agribusiness employers more control over their workers than they would have over undocumented workers, who can migrate to construction other fields and thus place some pressure upon agribusiness to raise its poverty-level wages.
At the time, being illegal and being a bracero, or contract worker, was practically interchangeable.
When employees work in an environment they are proud of, their satisfaction has an impact on client satisfaction," said Jorge Bracero, president and general director of pharmaceutical giant Pfizer.