Bottle


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Bottle

A British slang term for either 2 pounds or 200 pounds. The term derives from "bottle of glue," which rhymes with two. It is an example of Cockney rhyming slang.
References in classic literature ?
I heard it go into the pantry, and the biscuit-tins rattled and a bottle smashed, and then came a heavy bump against the cellar door.
For arms there dangled from the upper portion of the carcass two tolerably long bottles, with the necks outward for hands.
And I must leave all this"--he waved his arm round the dirty garret, with its unmade bed, the clothes lying on the floor, a row of empty beer bottles against the wall, piles of unbound, ragged books in every corner--"for some provincial university where I shall try and get a chair of philology.
Dolokhov, the bottle of rum still in his hand, jumped onto the window sill.
Thinking it both unfair and unkind to deprive her of any good qualities that were handy, the boy took down every bottle on the shelf and poured some of the contents in Margolotte's dish.
Trent rose up, measured the contents of the bottle with his forefinger, and poured out half the contents into a horn mug.
Here he broke off to tilt to his mouth the opened bottle Kwaque handed him.
Feeling convinced that she was in imminent danger of becoming downright drunk if I gave her another glass, I kept my hand on the bottle, and forthwith told my story over again in a very abridged and unceremonious form, and without allowing her one moment of leisure for comment on my narrative, whether it might be of the weeping, winking, drinking, groaning, or ejaculating kind.
Pete put down a bottle with a bang and turned a formidable face toward them.
s gladness, which somehow did not impress me, was duly and ostentatiously celebrated at the bottle.
I remember he wore a brown Cardigan jacket, and I know precisely the spot, in the midst of the array of bottles, from which he took the bottle of red-coloured syrup.
Arthur Gride, therefore, again applied himself to the press, and from a shelf laden with tall Flemish drinking-glasses, and quaint bottles: some with necks like so many storks, and others with square Dutch-built bodies and short fat apoplectic throats: took down one dusty bottle of promising appearance, and two glasses of curiously small size.