Border Tax Adjustment

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Border Tax Adjustment

A tax to which domestically produced goods and imports are subject but from which exports are exempt. Border tax adjustments are intended to encourage exports while not making imports excessively competitive against domestic goods. This may be seen as a barrier to trade.
References in periodicals archive ?
It might have been because Canada is making some real progress on carbon pricing, or because Sudbury has been so successful in its regreening and mining supply sector, or because I've given a few talks for the Citizens' Climate Lobby on carbon taxes and border tax adjustments.
There will be no violation of the GATT rules, as these rules explicitly allow for border tax adjustments.
5 percent for everything else; and border tax adjustments going forward whereby imported goods are subject to a tax (equal to the corporate tax rate of 20 percent) and revenues from exports are exempt.
For example, actions by one nation might include border tax adjustments to penalize those who do not incorporate climate damage into prices paid by their emitters.
5) Although ecotaxes are currently in place, to establish a norm of environmental respect worldwide, the World Trade Organization (WTO) should implement border tax adjustments (BTAs) on exports manufactured using inefficient energy technologies.
However, if such trade policy instruments are treated as border tax adjustments (BTAs) rather than border taxes (subsidies), the view of economists is that the principle for their use in the presence of a domestically imposed
This article explores some of these concerns by focusing on the potential trade impact of EU climate policies on Africa, specifically border tax adjustments on commodity exports and carbon standards and labelling for consumer goods.
As another example, Geoff Bertram's chapter on the possibility of the United States imposing border tax adjustments on New Zealand's exports of agricultural products is highly speculative.
Ways to solve the threat and protect these industries include border tax adjustments, to ensure that products coming in are priced its high as those made at home.
The study explores several mechanisms, such as border tax adjustments, that could be used to mitigate these effects, and finds that while such measures can be successful at reducing competitiveness impacts, such protection is likely costly to both the wider economy and the environment, and ill prepare Canada for a long-term future with significant carbon pricing.