Bookends


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Bookends

In advertising on television or radio, the practice of airing the same commercial twice, once at the beginning and once at the end of the commercial break. The idea behind using bookends is that doing so will help viewers recall the commercial and will therefore increase the likelihood that those viewers will buy the product.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hot glue embellishments on each bookend, if desired.
Featuring interviews with Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, original movie footage and live performances by Bookends, the show opens at the start of their career and ends at the much publicised break-up.
With bookend ads, the bank pays for a 30-second spot but, because it is divided into two 15-second segments, the ad has greater impact on the viewer--making the message easier for the consumer to recall.
From its various angles, Bookends has evolved through the years to improve its content and value for adult and teen viewers, while increasing teen involvement.
uk Ideal for would-be pilots or the well-travelled, these classic aeroplane bookends have an Art Deco feel that celebrates the golden age of travel.
Bookends, actual Masai leg bracelets lined in red leather, are $1,200 for the pair.
But the 10 tunes between those bookends often fall short.
The recorded snippets of Johnny's voice to his then-baby daughter before the first and last song tracks on the album and the 71 seconds of silence that is the 13th and final track 0:71 as a symbol of the fact that both Johnny Cash and Vivian Liberto died at age 71 are obvious bookends.
The footsore audience was rewarded with bookends of her suffering women, eloquently forming Ailey's shapes in the perfect adagio time.
Two full-time miners extract gemstones destined to be polished and made into saleable carvings, bookends, clocks, or jewelry in the gift store.
Denenberg's story not only bookends Anne's diary with a history of the Franks' prior life in Germany and Amsterdam and their various fates in camps scattered throughout Nazi territory, but also gives readers a new voice through the character of Margot, Anne's older sister.
If you want to use the bookends on a desk, you will likely need two of them to hold up the books.