Boldface


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Boldface

In printing, a typeface that is thicker than other typefaces of the same font. It is often used for emphasis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some producers don't like their friends being "accosted" by Boldface Names, which then publishes only the "snarkiest" comments.
DISINDIVISIBILITY (7) This word appears in boldface type at the entry dis- in the OED.
Under this expansion, Boldface will display its newly launching products on power-wing units, strategically placed in the beauty areas at CVS/pharmacy stores as of March 2013.
In response, Boldface petitioned a California federal court to get a judgement that the name Kroma "consists solely of a descriptive term and lacks any inherent distinctive meaning to the relevant consuming public and therefore is conceptually weak.
The lack of Boldface is just one aspect of a pervasive new philosophy about how to train people to make the SYSTEM (pilot plus machine) more effective.
All right, I prefer avoiding a lot of useless comm-jamming' on the ICS so: One click means I'm clear of the canopy and you can open or close It, two means I'm arming my seat, three clicks mean emergency boldface items are complete, four means
The films are in boldface for easy browsing and catalog numbers and other information has been omitted.
Then try to find all 20 boldface words and phrases in this word-find grid.
Select the information you want in the Query Wizard--Choose Columns dialog box by scrolling down the Available To help readers follow the instructions in this article, we use two different typefaces: Boldface type is used to identify the names of icons, agendas and URLs.
Run that sentence--beginning with "But--" and containing three bulleted items and our own inhouse style of italic boldface for publications, plus the idiosyncratic paragraphing--by any stylebook and see what you come up with.
But the law specifically says the disclaimer must come ``immediately below the ballot measure or candidate recommendation in the slate mailer, in no less than nine-point roman boldface type in a color or print that contrasts with the background so as to be easily legible.