Board Foot

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Board Foot

A unit of volume used to measure quantities of wood in Canada and the United States. One board foot is equivalent to 2.360 cubic meters.
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Jungwirth says the Forest Service can't even guarantee to deliver the i million board-feet she needs to keep her operation going for a year.
Collins' 94,000-acre mixed conifer Almanor Forest in northeastern California has produced 30 million board-feet a year for 50 years without clearcuts or herbicides.
Wilkinson figures on an annual allowable cut of 67,000 board-feet per year, and every fiv years he cuts about 500,000 board-feet of top-quality timber, currently bringin him as much as $64.
Using conservative assumptions about wood use in housing construction and other categories, softwood lumber demand is expected to climb to 51 billion board-feet in 1994 and 54 billion board-feet in 1995.
8 million board-feet of pine for Fibreboard, required virtually no road building (with its associated erosion), and produced no discernible impact on the land, while removing explosively flammable trees in a seriously overfueled forest.
Each commercial acre supports an average volume of over 7,500 board-feet, with a growth rate overall of some one million board-feet a year.
The mill processes logs at a projected rate of 5,000 per 10-hour shift, with an annual production of 50 million board-feet.
Several of the platforms could be connected to form rafts as much as 48 feet wide by 160 feet long and containing 180,000 board-feet of lumber.
Kinsey also pictures a Sitka spruce that produced an astounding 56,650 board-feet of lumber.
Each year more than 16 million board-feet are imported, 40 percent from Canada and the United States.
The famous New England hurricane of 1938, which came ashore 51 years ago (to the day, by incredible coincidence), destroyed some four billion board-feet of timber - less than two-thirds of Hugo's damage.
Price fluctuations in the chip market also have escalated the price of sawlog-quality alder, from less than $190 per 1,000 board-feet in 1988 to as much as $260 in the fall of 1989, which is what Bailey's company was offering for 12-to 14-inch logs in 24-to 40-foot lengths, scaled and delivered to the Port Angeles harbor.