Blue Collar

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Blue Collar

Describing an employee or occupation marked by skilled labor, especially manual labor earning an hourly wage. Examples of industries requiring blue collar workers include manufacturing, mining, and truck driving, among many others. The term is often used to describe a culture influenced by or an area populated largely with blue collar workers. Developed countries have seen a decline in blue collar occupations to developing countries, where labor is less expensive.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Dubaicharity has launched a programme to help the children of blue-collar workers plan their careers so they can have the opportunities their parents did not.
For the blue-collar workers the money they win is distributed evenly among themselves at the end of the game - but with the white-collar group the winner takes all.
In one spot, an actor appearing as a blue-collar worker is screamed at incessantly as he goes through his daily motions at work.
We have set the contribution limit to Rs11,000 [Dh662]," said Ashok Kumar a blue-collar worker.
MAURICE LUCAS, former NBA forward: "I'm a blue-collar worker.
Dubai: More than 400 blue-collar workers received their certificates after completing an 18-week course in English and computers skills.
Luckhaupt added that blue-collar workers would benefit greatly from "health programs that combine reducing occupational risk factors like job stress with health promotion activities like smoking cessation.
May 19, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- In overwhelming numbers, Pennsylvania highway contractors are hiring blue-collar workers and will continue to add to those numbers over the next several years, according to a survey by Associated Pennsylvania Constructors.
IN YEARS PAST, many people believed that blue-collar workers in lower- to middle-income jobs were the primary buyers of voluntary products.
His results revealed that high-skilled blue-collar workers, such as those in construction trades and mechanics, were actually the highest daily users of maths, while those in lower paid white collar roles such as clerks and sales workers used it the least, News.
Events such as this will also help to give Qatar's blue-collar workers a sense of identity.
The gap in optimism was most evident between white-collar (38%) -- defined as professional workers in fields such as business or education -- and blue-collar workers (33%) -- defined as workers in fields such as manufacturing or the service industry.