Blue Tongue

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Blue Tongue

A slang term for a $10 note in Australia. The term is derived from the blue tongue skink, an Australian lizard, as well as the fact that $10 notes are mostly blue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Selon l'association, l'office devrait jouer son role en veillant au vaccin et au traitement des animaux, surtout qu'un cas de blue-Tongue (maladie bovine) aurait ete identifie dans une region du Royaume.
He runs Blue-Tongue Films with his brother Joel and five friends.
The movie brought international renown to the loose Aussie filmmaking collective dubbed Blue-Tongue Films, of which Michod and Edgerton are members.
The Australian filmmaking collective Blue-Tongue Films has been around since 1996, when a handful of friends made a short that turned out good enough to warrant persistence.
A desert tortoise, bearded dragon and blue-tongue skink will be on hand to drive home the seriousness of the environmental issues facing these creatures.
These include the desperate need to improve the financial returns received by many primary producers, the costly impacts of animal diseases such as bovine TB and blue-tongue, the threat of globalised food supply chains, which do not always operate on a level playing field, and the consequences of climate change and strategies to mitigate against climate change.
They represent a breakthrough for UK sheep farmers and have been achieved despite the setbacks of foot-and-mouth and blue-tongue disease and are a testament to the value of collaboration in the livestock sector.
Farming leaders called for an import ban on livestock from blue-tongue areas in Europe after the disease was discovered in the herd on a farm near Worcester.
Tests for the blue-tongue virus are being conducted on animals and midges in Suffolk after a cow was diagnosed on Saturday.
Beyond were perished paddocks of spiky yellow gorse, a purple haze of Scotch thistle, hollow prickle-bushes and bomb cars--the haunt of cats, rats, rabbits and foxes, snakes, blue-tongue lizards and the tetanus bacterium.
It would be a stretch to say that blue tongue skinks are taking the reptile world by storm, but what Griffith calls "the blue-tongue bug" does appear to be spreading.
The largest in this group is the blue-tongue lizard.