Blue Law


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Blue Law

A law intended to enforce religious morality. In general, blue laws refer to public observance of holy days through the restriction of commerce. While most blue laws in the United States have been repealed, many states restrict the sale of alcohol on Sunday, the Christian Sabbath. Other countries have similar restrictions on Jewish, Islamic and other holidays.
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In numerous cases brought before the Supreme Court, the blue laws were upheld.
Although some in the churches truly believed in the sanctity of the Christian Sabbath, religion was not a major part of the campaign to reinstate the blue laws in Arkansas.
Sometimes Baptists emerge from the grassroots, as in the case of literal Baptists who supported Prohibition and Blue Laws.
The repeal of blue laws decreases the relative probability of being at least "pretty happy" relative to "not happy" by about 17 percent.
She parses Max Weber along with the Talmud, Saint Paul along with George Eliot, blue laws along with the Babylonian exile.
This tenant was from New York City and was not aware of Bergen County Blue Laws.
Unfortunately, however, the centers are closed on Sundays due to the blue laws enacted by the town of Paramus.
There are a variety of cultural and industry-specific trends helping to maintain the vitality of the wine and spirits industries--among them are the American consumer's steady movement away from beer in favor of wine and spirits; the demonstrated positive health effects of moderate alcohol consumption; the liberalizing of archaic beverage alcohol blue laws nationwide, with particularly positive results from the growth of Sunday sales (which DISCUS tabs at an extra $212 million in new retailer revenue in 2006); and a more spirits- and wine-savvy public that is responding to increasing product education from retailers, distributors and suppliers.
Blue laws aimed at curtailing business activities on Sunday are increasingly being scrutinized by lawmakers.
43) In Braunfeld and Crown Kosher, Orthodox Jewish retail merchants in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts attacked their states' blue laws for unfairly burdening their religious convictions.
It is an interesting "read," but requires a bit of work, not because it is particularly profound, but because it is full of delightful tidbits, such as French fries were invented in Belgium and America's Blue Laws once forbade mothers to kiss their children on Sunday.
They find that repealing blue laws leads to an increase in drinking and drug use, and that this increase is found only among the initially religious individuals who were affected by the blue laws.