Count

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Count

On a point & figure chart, an estimation of future price movements. Point & figure charts seek to identify support and resistance levels. Counts are estimates on the likelihood that a security will break through one or the other and result in a large profit or loss.
References in periodicals archive ?
How strange it was to look at my own complete blood cell count report and see a white blood cell count of 100/[micro]L and a platelet count of 10,000/[micro]L As a specialist in hematology, I had looked at many reports similar to mine with detached concern.
As with other cancer drugs that suppress white blood cell counts, infections that are serious may require hospitalization and can sometimes be fatal.
Assuming that your diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia is correct, a three-month course of iron therapy should restore your red blood cell count to normal and replenish your iron stores.
6[degrees] F and his white blood cell count was 14,400/[mm.
Barnes, whose leukemia remained chronic for seven years, said he is in hematologic remission, in which his white blood cell count is considered normal.
This condition can be life threatening in individuals with sickle cell anemia and immunosuppressed patients who cannot afford a further drop in red blood cell count.
Laboratory tests revealed a white blood cell count of 18,800/[mm.
Seventeen days after she received a cup of her 4-year-old brother's bone marrow, it started battling Meghan's aggressive cancer, and her white blood cell count increased.
The most serious side effects associated with Leustatin include fever and a low white blood cell count during the first two months after treatment.
The high-altitude adaptation response is understood to evoke increases in red blood cell count, capillary density and metabolic improvement.
Pazdur's team discovered that at very high doses of taxotere, cancer patients suffered hair loss, mouth sores, and a low white blood cell count.
A second blood sample from former Tour de France winner Marco Pantani confirmed an earlier finding of an abnormal red blood cell count, indicating the possible use of banned hormones.