blockholder

Blockholder

A shareholder with an exceptionally large amount or value of stock. While there is no specific definition of how many shares constitute a block, most people using the term refer to holding or trading more than 10,000 shares and/or shares worth more than $200,000. Almost invariably, blockholders are institutional investors. See also: Block trade, Secondary issue.

blockholder

The owner of a large proportion of ownership shares of a company.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other important determinants of performance-turnover sensitivity include managerial ownership, blockholder ownership, and the threat of takeover activity.
Nor do we discuss companies with a dominant blockholder that exerts considerable influence without having a lock on control.
The heterogeneity of goals of multiple family owners introduces unique agency problems, which Zellweger and Kammerlander refer to as blockholder conflicts.
Robinson & William Savitt, Fair Markets and Fair Disclosure: Some Thoughts on the Law and Economics of Blockholder Disclosure, and the Use and Abuse of Shareholder Power, 3 HARV.
Along those lines, In re Sanchez Energy reinforces the notion that "a large blockholder will not be considered a controlling stockholder unless they actually control the board's decision about the challenged transaction.
Impact of Corporate Insider, Blockholder, and Institutional Equity Ownership on Firm Risk-taking.
Core, Holthausen, and Larcker (1999) find that CEO compensation level is negatively associated with presence of an external blockholder who owns at least 5% of the equity.
revising the rules governing blockholder disclosure.
However, the presence of a large blockholder can reduce opportunistic behaviours and enhance family firms' performance during crisis periods.
On the other hand, founding family firms have lower agency cost because they benefit from a high level of insider ownership, a low level of blockholder ownership, and a low level of foreign.