Blackout


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Blackout

1. A situation in which local television and radio stations do not broadcast a live sports match or similar event. A blackout is most common when a company wishes to increase ticket sales for the event. The blackout may be canceled if the event sells all tickets a certain number of days before.

2. See: Blackout period.
References in periodicals archive ?
But there's one thing on which most of them agree: "We will always have blackouts," says Hoff Stauffer, of Cambridge Energy Research Associates.
The notice must be provided by the plan administrator at least 30 days (but not more than 60 days) before the last date on which a participant could exercise the rights affected by the blackout period.
Blackouts were initially imposed in July after the worst drought in 50 years depleted the nation's hydroelectric reservoirs.
In addition, cotton-less cartridge structures, cotton mouthpieces, cartridge double-deck liquid-retaining cartridges and silicone rings ensure that Blackout X pens do not leak.
III) Telcos must show a list of blackout days for the existing calendar year on their individual websites, prior to the beginning of each calendar year and there must be area-wise circulation of the list, jointly with the tariff plans delivered by the telco, in every six month.
As mergers and acquisitions of systems take place, the configurations of the blackout policy could be impacted.
Washington, June 30 (ANI): The higher the number of alcohol-related memory blackouts a student experiences, the greater is his/her risk of a future injury while under the influence, according to a new study.
Con-Ed recently submitted a report to the Mayor on the power outage, including the role of Demand Response, in helping to prevent a wider blackout to customers in Queens, New York.
A breakdown in a complex grid of electric lines and switches led to a series of events that caused the blackout.
Richardson's Republican successor as energy secretary, Spencer Abraham, agreed that the blackout reflected inadequate centralized regulation of the energy industry.
The August 14th blackout indicates that the general public is far away from attaining this level of electrical availability.