Blackout

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Blackout

1. A situation in which local television and radio stations do not broadcast a live sports match or similar event. A blackout is most common when a company wishes to increase ticket sales for the event. The blackout may be canceled if the event sells all tickets a certain number of days before.

2. See: Blackout period.
References in periodicals archive ?
Critics say the black-outs are due to a lack of investment in infrastructure.
She also suffered black-outs, dizziness, vomiting and double vision.
Now there is a way to lower utility bills, reduce the probability of black-outs or brown-outs, and contribute to the betterment of the environment, all without degrading the home's aesthetics.
The result was doubly unpleasant for many Egyptians, with air-conditioners and refrigerators shutting down amid increasingly frequent black-outs in the evening, when celebrations in the fasting month of Ramadan were at their height.
The report, for the Department of Public Enterprise, also predicted that many areas face the risk of black-outs because of the poor state of the national grid.
SatCon's Rotary UPS is designed to provide both high-quality power during normal operation and to prevent any interruption of electricity to critical manufacturing, information, or service operations in case of power grid failures such as black-outs and brown-outs.
Because of this, there are still frequent black-outs.
It hasn't happened yet, and during two black-outs last winter when the rest of the village remained dark and cold, David's house shone out like a beacon.
There are very few companies that can afford to lose precious e-mails or server information that can be lost during unpredictable weather, black-outs or natural disasters such as the recent fires in California.
Without it, the country will continue to suffer crippling black-outs which will threaten stability.
IRELAND was on the brink of power black-outs last night as ESB workers launched unofficial lightning strikes.
The executives cited the increasing sophistication of viruses, hackers, internal errors and disasters, such as the recent Northeastern black-outs, as critical disruptive events corporations should consider when employing a continuance strategy.