Black and White


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Black and White

Describing an advertisement, especially one containing pictures, that lacks any color other than black and white. Because colors are more expensive than black ink on white paper, and because they are less likely to attract attention, black and white advertisements are comparatively inexpensive.
References in periodicals archive ?
Virginia Supreme Court case that struck down laws banning black and white marriages was handed down in 1967.
Another way to assess the performance of the education system with respect to racial disparities in achievement is to compare the subsequent performance of black and white students with similar initial scores.
Taken together, both AlabamaNorth and Racial Situations show how individuals, both black and white, necessarily operate within boundaries set by race and class, yet largely shape their own identities.
30] Although colonization publications did not abound with alarmist rhetoric about sex or marriage between black and white Americans, the amalgamation argument still underpinned nearly every pronouncement of the necessity of separating the two races.
By the late 19th century the bleak economy had given rise to numerous protest organizations throughout the South designed to help poor farmers, both black and white.
Ayers analyzes the pattern of lynchings during their peak, the 1880s and 1890s, and finds the highest concentration in two regions that shared low rural population density, a fairly high proportion of blacks, and considerable migrancy among black and white populations.
a black and white marble floor" (16), "a dark brightness" (20)--all of which point to Sarah's internal struggle.
They asserted that rank and not race, regulation and not custom, should structure relations between black and white servicemen.
Washington, casts the mixed-race character as a culturally placeless entity, a perception held not only by Chesnutt but also by his black and white acquaintances.
In New People: Miscegenation and Mulattoes in the United States Joel Williamson notes that "free mulattoes of the more affluent sort in the lower South were treated by influential whites as a third class, an acceptable and sometimes valuable intermediate element between black and white, slave and free.
Both a consequence and a cause of a new progressive and militant subjectivity in the Southern heartland of racism during the Great Depression, Strong beat one of the greatest odds in America, by fighting actively with black and white workers against racist oppression internationally.
Full browser ?