Biological Weapons Convention

(redirected from Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention)
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Biological Weapons Convention

An international treaty forbidding signatories from developing or possessing weapons that may be used in biowarfare. It requires signatories to dispose of or change the use of the biological weapons they possess at the time of signature and mandates assistance to countries suffering from violations of the treaty. Most of the world's countries are signatories to the Biological Weapons Convention. Twenty-two original nations signed the Convention in 1972, and it became effective in 1975.
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Canada also used this forum to promote the utility and relevance of multilateral treaties generally, and the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention specifically.
A draft text for a protocol to the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention is now in the final stages of development and could be opened for signature and ratification within a year.
Features of an Outbreak Investigation under a Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention Protocol
Most scientific aspects of an outbreak investigation in a Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention context are identical to those of a comparable investigation in a public health context.
For the public health community and their colleagues in plant and animal epidemiology, negotiating a protocol to the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention will establish formal procedures for the investigation of certain outbreaks.
The Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention, which the US and 143 other countries have ratified, prohibits development, acquisition, and stockpiling of any biological agents not justifiable for peaceful or prophylactic purposes.
The demise of the biological weapons capability of the United States in 1969 and the advent of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention in 1972 caused governments in the West to go to sleep to the possibility of biological weapons development throughout the rest of the world, as technically knowledgeable workers were transferred and retired, intelligence desks were closed down, and budgets were cut.
These developments gave impetus to the creation of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention, originally drafted by the British but finalized by the Soviet Union.
It was carried out in great secrecy, after the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention had been signed.

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