value

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Value

A measure of worth. Value is generally expressed in monetary terms. For example, the value of a house may be $100,000. Generally, the value of a product depreciates over time, though it sometimes appreciates instead (notably in real estate). How easily one can sell a product for its value helps determine how liquid the product is.

value

the money worth of a PRODUCT or ASSET. Value is measured in terms of the PRICE which buyers are prepared to pay for the product or asset. The amount which they are prepared to pay depends upon the benefits which they expect to derive from consuming or owning the item. See PRICE-QUALITY TRADEOFF, PSYCHOLOGICAL PRICING, VALUE CREATED MODEL, CONSUMER SURPLUS.

value

the money worth of an ASSET or PRODUCT. Early economists such as Adam SMITH and David RICARDO suggested that the value of an asset or product depended upon the amount of LABOUR needed to produce it, while later economists like William JEVONS emphasized that the UTILITY of a product to a consumer determined its value. Nowadays, economists accept that both supply and demand factors are important in determining the value of a product, by establishing a MARKET PRICE for it. See also CONSUMERS’ SURPLUS, VALUE ADDED, PARADOX OF VALUE.

value

The worth of all rights arising from ownership of property.

References in periodicals archive ?
Six groups of rats were fed on the experimental diets T1-T6 (as mentioned in the biological value experiment) and the seventh batch of animals was fed with protein free basal diet (T7) for the determination of endogenous and metabolic nitrogen loss in faeces and urine.
5) The biological value of gari has been found to be raised from 47 to 68 with this blend.
An excellent source of bioavailable iron and zinc, vitamin B12, high biological value protein, niacin, vitamin B6 and phosphorus
Eggs, meats and cheeses are good examples of protein foods of high biological value that can be easily included in the patient's daily food intake.
He also outlines the biological value of different protein sources so that you can choose the right protein.
In general, proteins from animal sources have a higher biological value than proteins from plant sources, though there are two marked exceptions to this, Quinoa and Soya, which are especially important to vegetarians and vegans.
Watersheds with the highest biological value, as measured by the number of endemic bird and fish species, are also generally the most degraded," says Carmen Revenga of the WRI.