Bema

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Bema

An ancient Greek unit of length approximately equivalent to 1.54 meters. It was also called a diploun bema.
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The bimah was a raised platform surrounded by a simple railing, reached by four stairs on the north and south sides.
WOODLAND HILLS - Eleanor Gross was so honored at being able to handle a Torah scroll during a service on Yom Kippur - the holiest day of the year for Jews - she burst into tears on the bimah.
With these thoughts in mind, this essay examines one specific element of a synagogue's interior architecture, its bimah, the rostrum from which services are led and from which public readings of the Torah are conducted, in order to explore how the appearance of this feature of a sanctuary and its orientation within the synagogue hall help to frame the theatrical experience that is a Jewish worship service.
In the play, Jack chooses to follow his father on the bimah, and sing for the chosen people instead of his chosen people.
Back then, it never occurred to me to question this reality or the fact that the only people I ever saw on the bimah were men.
Father led the Sabbath service that Friday night without our participation on the bimah, and he earned a few rubles for it.
ENCINO - By his own admission, Rabbi John Borak has traveled a twisted road to the bimah at Temple Ner Maarav in Encino.
The "Synagogue Jews," East Europeans, made up the majority of the membership of Heska Amuna, then an Orthodox congregation, where for a time "smeckl tabac" was made available in a snuffbox on the bimah to the men called to read from the Torah.
Nidhe Israel was refurbished and rededicated in 1987, and today services are once again held in its soaring sanctuary, furnished with mahogany pews and bimah.
Rabbi Samuel Gross sat alone on the bimah in a darkness brightened only by the eternal light shining dimly above the hand crafted Holy Ark.
Fifteen years ago when I became Temple Beth Torah's cantor, a woman on the bimah (structure or platform housing the altar) was almost shocking,'' said Rosen.
Cohen's idea of an octagonal seating plan around a central bimah, in the Sephardic tradition, bore some resemblance to several of his own unbuilt projects.