Bill of Rights


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Bill of Rights: English Bill of Rights, Bill of Rights 1689

Bill of Rights

A generic term referring to a (usually concise) list of rights that citizens of a state possess. For example, a bill of rights may include the freedom to practice religion and the freedom to vote for the candidate of one's choice. There are two types of bill of rights. An entrenched bill of rights may not be amended without a complicated process, such as a popular referendum. An unentrenched bill of rights, on the other hand, may be amended or changed by normal legislative procedure. See also: Constitution.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Labunski's analysis of the struggles surrounding the Bill of Rights should give pause to those that would freely cede their constitutional rights.
The Bill of Rights protected citizens from potential abuses of power by the federal government.
Thus, Wilson was declaring that no bill of rights was better than a bill of rights, because with no bill of rights there would not be a list of rights that would lead one to believe that other conceivable rights would be denied to the people.
Most importantly, the author fails to appreciate the importance of French-Canadian opposition to any constitutional bill of rights in the 1950s.
Here I will suggest seven questions we should ask before succumbing to the conventional wisdom about "the need for a strong patients' bill of rights," as conventional wisdom's fount, the New York Times editorial page, put it.
By the time the provision got through the lobbying process, however, that portion of the original Taxpayer Bill of Rights was removed.
Bill of Rights essentially offered qualified World War Two veterans - those who had served on active duty in the armed forces for at least ninety days without a dishonorable discharge - four ways to improve their socio-economic conditions.
These arguments culminated in the enactment of the Taxpayer Bill of Rights 2, which provides rules similar to those already in existence for private foundations and allows the Internal Revenue Service to levy penalties on individuals who benefit from inurement.
After he finished, someone from the audience asked what a local suburban public library--which had the Library Bill of Rights written into its collection development policy--should do about a challenge it was experiencing at the time against the controversial rap group 2 Live Crew.
In issuing the challenge, the nation's leading network of breast cancer survivors and activists unveiled a new Breast Cancer Bill of Rights that they promise to fight for.
Constitution's Bill of Rights-one of 12 surviving copies sent to the states by President George Washington in 1789-opens at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia on Bill of Rights Day, December 15, 2014.
A potential new Bill of Rights should go further than current human rights laws, parliamentarians said yesterday.