Big-Ticket Item


Also found in: Medical.

Big-Ticket Item

An expensive retail good. A big ticket item may be regarded as a necessity for an individual or business. For example, a farm generally must purchase big ticket items like tractors. Big ticket items are ordinarily bought on credit, with the buyer making periodic payments.
References in periodicals archive ?
April 25, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- A web-based survey of American adults reveals that no matter how you look at it, stereotypes about men being "out of it" when it comes to the decision-making process of small and big-ticket items are folly.
uk(R), a part of Experian, reveals nearly a third of British consumers plan to make panic purchases of big-ticket items prior to the VAT increase next week, which will be followed by a period of reduced spending on nonessentials.
Whether you're planning on buying a new car or a home, researching the best way to finance that big-ticket item should be fast, easy and pain-free," said Bob Brisco, CEO, CarsDirect.
Coma the holidays, the big-ticket items naturally get the most attention and a lion's share of the budget.
In September, someone was impersonating a Chief from a First Nation Band and contacting people in order to sell big-ticket items, like large farm equipment or machinery, on the online classified website, Kipp.
But big-ticket items, including furniture and TVs, continued to suffer in December amid weak consumer confidence.
Mr Falque-Pierrotin said laptops, televisions and big-ticket items such as large domestic appliances were not selling, while iPads and tablet computers, headphones and large TVs were performing well.
Costco UK's pre-tax profits fell for the second consecutive year last year as the wholesaler continued to face competition from supermarket deals and customers move away from big-ticket items.
Clothing retailers endured another poor month and demand for big-ticket items was especially weak.
As state residents began buying big-ticket items (such as cars and furniture) out-of-state, most states added a use tax.
But, will tumbling real estate prices produce a negative "wealth effect" and limit consumer buying of big-ticket items this holiday season?