Big Bang

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Big Bang

The term applied to the liberalization in 1986 of the London Stock Exchange (LSE) when trading was automated.

Big Bang

An informal term referring to the deregulation of the London Stock Market on October 27, 1986. On that date, a number of changes occurred, including a shift from an open outcry system to an electronic exchange. Perhaps most important, however, was the abolition of fixed commissions, which completely changed the way brokers on the London Stock Market conducted their business. Big Bang significantly increased the volume on the London Stock Exchange and reversed its trend of falling behind other world stock markets. It was a major part of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's financial reform program.

It is important to note that one does not refer to Big Bang as the Big Bang.

Big Bang

The date, October 27, 1986, on which the London security markets were significantly deregulated. The deregulation eliminated fixed commissions on security trades and put an end to the prohibition against securities firms acting as brokers and dealers.

big bang

see STOCK EXCHANGE.
References in periodicals archive ?
This origin of the universe is somewhat similar to the big bang model, in which the universe exploded from a singular point at the beginning, but the physics is quite different.
First detection of beryllium in a very metal poor star--a test of the standard big bang model.
Franco Selleri of the Universita di Bari in Italy provided an equally interesting alternative--the certainty that the Universe in which we live and breathe is a construction in simple 3-D Euclidean space precludes the possibility of the Big Bang model.
Another link in the realization of the big bang model was the Dutch astronomer-cosmologist Willem de Sitter, who suggested in 1917, together with Einstein, the de-Sitter-universe, which was based on the formulae of the General Theory of Relativity.
The second pillar on which the big bang model rests is the stretching of light in an expanding universe.
Instead of the standard big bang model, which is based on the simplest interpretation of the red shift, this model constructs a whole new universe, one with definite limits, about 2,000 times smaller than the old continually expanding one.
The Big Bang model combined with inflation matches several important observations, including the detailed structure of the radiation called the cosmic microwave background, which is left over from the universe's birth.
This would create tiny temperature differences within the struck brane that, like those in the standard Big Bang model, become the seeds for galaxy formation.
Instead, the cosmos has no defined beginning and could be thousands of times older than the 15 to 20 billion years indicated by most Big Bang models.
This discovery, coupled with earlier, ground-based observations that the same star contains far more beryllium than predicted by the standard Big Bang model, may call into question some key assumptions about the chemical environment in the very early universe (SN: 9/7/91, p.
Examining the faint light from an elderly Milky way star, astronomers have detected a far greater abundance of beryllium atoms than the standard Big Bang model predicts.
Proponents of the Big Bang model counter such criticism by noting that this unbalanced situation merely reflects the strength of the evidence in the model's favor.