bid-ask spread

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Bid-Ask Spread

On an exchange, the difference between the highest price a buyer of a security or other asset is willing to pay and the lowest price a seller is willing to offer. Generally speaking, the more liquid an asset is, the lower the bid-ask spread is. As a result, currency, which is considered the most liquid asset, has an extremely low bid-ask spread.

bid-ask spread

See spread.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the main analysis, we focus on time-weighted quoted and relative bid-ask spreads both in a univariate and in a multivariate analysis, controlling for firm characteristics.
Alerts are automatically triggered, when certain thresholds for changes in traded prices, bid-ask spreads and order book resilience are exceeded.
Bid-ask spreads have decreased over time and revenues to market-makers have decreased from 1.
Through its unique integration of bilateral and cleared markets, NEO Markets facilitates tighter bid-ask spreads in the physical crude oil grades and offers substantially reduced total transaction costs than what is currently available in the OTC markets.
Since a good investor protection environment will minimize the costs of information asymmetry, and thereby reduce the probability of trading against informed traders, liquidity providers will incur relatively lower costs and therefore offer narrower bid-ask spreads.
Another key issue for the IILM Sukuk, which are expected to have maturities of up to one year, will be their bid-ask spreads in the secondary market.
Lastly, by comparing trades for which customers pay and receive inflation, we are able to infer a realized bid-ask spread for customers of 3 basis points, which essentially matches the quoted bid-ask spreads reported by dealers.
In this study, we analyze the relationship between the quality of firms' annual reports and the information asymmetry component of the firms' cost of capital--namely, the relative bid-ask spreads between awarded firms and non-awarded firms.
Higher transaction volumes lead to lower bid-ask spreads, which reinforces the attractiveness of the dollar in the foreign exchange markets.
Bid-ask spreads, a liquidity proxy, have been quite low over the past five years (about 10-15 basis points).
We add to the literature by examining the impact of the introduction of the Securities Market Amendment Act 2002 in New Zealand on several aspects of the market, namely bid-ask spreads, liquidity, price volatility and the cost of capital.
It seems that the abnormal returns likely are driven by stocks with high bid-ask spreads (Sub3).