Beveridge Report


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Beveridge Report

A report to the British Cabinet recommending the creation of the modern Welfare State. The Beveridge Report cited five social evils in the United Kingdom: squalor, ignorance, want, idleness and disease. It recommended an expansion of the National Insurance program and the creation of what became the National Health Service. It was published in 1941 and most of its recommendations were adopted following the Labour Party victory in the 1945 election.
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The 1942 Beveridge Report highlighted the need to create comprehensive health services for all.
The Beveridge Report was published just after the battle of Alamein, when the light at the end of the tunnel looked very distant, and the socialist Archbishop of Canterbury, William Temple, was able to say in all sincerity that the report embodied the whole of the Christian ethic.
After the Second World War, the Beveridge Report was implemented and the State was committed to looking after its citizens from the cradle to the grave.
By putting together the various economic and social arguments for independence in such a clear and robust fashion, Scotland's Future has emerged as the first fully comprehensive manifesto for political change seen in the UK since, arguably, the Beveridge Report which laid the basis for the welfare state," he argued, concluding.
When the Beveridge Report came out, the intention was to provide a safety net for the very poorest in society and to provide help for people who needed it until their situation improved again.
THERE is a debate to be had about both health and welfare, about the settlement at the end of the Second World War based on the Beveridge Report and whether it is the best one.
Labour worked hard to associate itself with the Beveridge Report through the Daily Herald and its own pamphlet publications.
Why does Mr Hartley think the war-time Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill personally ordered the publication of The Beveridge Report just before the second Battle of El Alamein?
The move forms part of the biggest shake-up of the modern welfare state since the Beveridge Report of the 1940s.
THE health service and social security scheme was mooted by Winston Churchill during World War II and backed by the Liberals (and opposed by Labour) resulting in the Beveridge Report.
Agreements about welfare arrived at only after the Beveridge Report have gone back into the melting-pot.