Berne Convention


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Berne Convention

A treaty governing international recognition of copyrights. The Convention requires members to apply the laws of their own country to works and inventions originally from other countries. For example, a book published in Australia is treated in Russia the same as if it had been published originally in Russia. This extension of copyright does not require additional registration. That is, the author in Australia does not have to re-register his/her book in Russia for it to be recognized as his/her intellectual property. Author Victor Hugo originated the idea for the Berne Convention, which was signed in 1886.
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With respect to copyright, the TRIPS agreement added a viable enforcement mechanism--the Worm Trade Organization (WTO)--to the minimum standards provided in the earlier Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works.
becoming a signatory to the Berne Convention in 1989, the U.
Written by one of the most distinguished scholars of copyright both in the United States and abroad, this volume is a unique synthesis of copyright law and practice, taking into account the Berne Convention, the TRIPs Agreement, and the advent of the Internet.
The cabinet also approved two draft laws for Kuwait's joining Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works and on joining Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property.
Article 17 of the Berne Convention, although not in express terms,
The legal precedent establishing the 1886 International Berne Convention on Intellectual Property as Canada's predominant copyright legislation was the result of Mary vs.
Following is a brief discussion of the evolution of treaties protecting copyright throughout the years, focusing on three of the main agreements: the Berne Convention, the Universal Copyright Convention, and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), including Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS).
Since its inception, EPNworld has asked registered editors and publishers to abide by the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works.
2) This Comment will examine several of these international treaties and trade agreements, including the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works,(3) the Geneva(4) and Rome Conventions,(5) the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (Uruguay Round)(6)--trade negotiations under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT),(7) the Universal Copyright Convention,(8) and the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPs).
76) But the Berne Convention also contains a separate provision,