Benefit Segmentation

Benefit Segmentation

In marketing, a strategy that divides potential customers into different groups based on the benefits they seek to derive from products. For example, benefit segmentation may divide customers into those who look primarily for short-term fun in their purchases, and those who are after long-term advantage. Behavior segmentation is most useful when a product is likely to appeal to persons in a specific niche. It is a form of market segmentation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Studies in the 1980s tied benefit segmentation to product preferences in terms of design and packaging (Woodside & Jacobs, 1985), and to market preferences in terms of sociodemographics, particularly age (Shoemaker, 1994).
The advantages of benefit segmentation are that it can enable managers to fine-tune products, and redefine or re-promote tourism products to meet traveller needs (Lee, Morrison, & O'Leary, 2006), ultimately converting demand into sales.
Significant benefit segmentation of an existing product category is the No.
Benefit segmentation is a form of behavioral segmentation based on causal factors, as opposed to descriptive factors, based on the benefits or rewards the customer is seeking in the purchase decision (example: long-term versus immediate benefit).
A Least Squares Procedure for Benefit Segmentation with Conjoint Experiments.
A Clusterwise Regression Method for Simultaneous Fuzzy Market Structuring and Benefit Segmentation.
Using our benefit segmentation we assess the performance of 119 hotspots and hot zones in 40 cities in the U.