Benefit Cost Ratio


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Benefit Cost Ratio

A ratio representing the benefits of a project or investment compared to its cost. The BCR may be a strictly financial ratio, comparing the expected return to the cost of investment, or it may account for approximations of qualitative measurements.
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The three economic measures that are currently recommended by the Australian Transport Council (ATC) are the benefit cost ratio (BCR), the net present value (NPV), and the first-year rate of return (FYRR).
Diarrheal Diseases Soil Degradation Loss of Agricultural Output Rangeland Degradation Loss of Livestock Carrying Capacity Deforestation Loss of Sustainable Timber Supply Tourism Decline in Tourism Revenues Total Annual Benefit Total Cost as % of GDP Average Benefit--US$ as % of 1992 GDP Average Annual Cost to Restore Environment (Million Rs) Benefit Cost Ratio Low Estimate High Estimate Problem (Million US$) (Million US$) Urban Air Pollution 174 273 Water Pollution, Health Impacts 300 812 Soil Degradation 221 270 Rangeland Degradation 67 116 Deforestation 19 24 Tourism 11 22 Total Annual Benefit 792 1517 Total Cost as % of GDP 2.
The business case for Capital Metro stage one, prepared with input from internationally renowned economics firm EY, showed the project has a positive benefit cost ratio of 1.
Over the next two years, the required benefit cost ratio has been reduced from 2:1 to 1:1 and the crash history requirement has come down from three to two casualty crashes in five years.
The estimated rebuilding cost of PS700m cannot achieve a sufficiently high benefit cost ratio and would be better served as part of the TrawsCymru long distance bus network .
In addition to this, the minimum required benefit cost ratio for funded projects will be reduced from 2:1 to 1:1, making more projects eligible.
Ultimately BIS would like to compare the benefits of compensating EIIs with the cost of that compensation, where possible expressed as a benefit cost ratio.
This is similar to Crossrail and higher than the benefit cost ratio for some other major projects when approved, such as Thames Link and the Jubilee Line extension.
This column has already shown that there is an acceptable rate of return benefit cost ratio (BCR) on electrification to Swansea, if the scheme goes ahead on an incremental basis from the Crossrail scheme from London to Reading.
According to Infrastructure Australia's own costings methodology, the benefit cost ratio for Capital Metro at our medium growth scenario was 2.