Barometer Stock

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Barometer Stock

A stock in a well-known or highly-regarded company in a given sector. The performance of a barometer stock is considered to be an indicator of the performance of its particular sector or industry. The term "barometer stock" is chiefly British; in the U.S., the primary term is bellwether stock.
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Within oilfield services it's best to hold the bellwether stocks as they will be taking market share," Menges said.
Investors should also note that the portfolio consists of bellwether stocks (40%) and non-bellwether stocks (60%), while the dividing line between the two is how much they are exposed to the automation industry.
The big cell phone companies are the bellwether stocks in any market, they're so well correlated to the overall GDP story - that's why international investors get into these markets," said Bull, who invested about 10-20 percent of his fund's money in the Asiacell offering.
It likes companies with high and sustainable dividends, while mega caps - typically household names and bellwether stocks in their respective industries - are best able to withstand periods of economic weakness but do not tend to grow as fast as smaller companies in good times.
Bellwether stocks such as Emaar Properties dropped 5.
The banking sector performed well with Abu Dhabi Islamic Bank and Bank of Sharjah also posting gains with bellwether stocks Aldar, Sorouh and Dana Gas all ending flat.
The disappointing economic figures were at odds with earnings from Pfizer and other bellwether stocks, which are largely surprising on the upside.
Bellwether stocks such as brewing and beverages giant Bavaria, the largest cement maker Argos and banks BanColombia and Banco de Bogota are still seen by many analysts as the only relatively good buys.
A lot of the old traditional systems-integration companies have been the bellwether stocks.
Looking at bellwether stocks in the market, Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT) is gathering some relative strength.
The Index is rebalanced on a quarterly basis, and is usually weighted 40 percent toward bellwether stocks and 60 percent toward non-bellwether stocks.
Blue chip companies, including real estate developer Emaar Properties and construction firm Drake and Scull International, were among the bellwether stocks to post losses.